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The Andrews Family from Center for Lit Rock the HEAV Convention

Enter to Win a Family Registration to HEAV Homeschool Convention and Reading Roadmaps from Center for Lit

All right, my friends, settle in, because I have something very cool for you today.

As I mentioned in last week’s post, Center for Lit‘s amazing family members, Adam Andrews and his son Ian, are going to be speaking at the Home Educators Association of Virginia Convention June 8-10.   And I am totally going to be there.

You know what a crazy lit lady the Lit Mama is.  I can’t wait to attend these workshops.  Even better?  I got the chance to speak with Ian and ask him a few questions about his workshops and I’m even more stoked than I was last week.

But make sure you read All The Way To The Bottom, because I’m giving away a FREE FAMILY REGISTRATION to the HEAV Convention PLUS Center for Lit is giving away a FREE K-12 LITERARY SCOPE AND SEQUENCE: READING ROADMAPS to celebrate their participation!

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My First Homeschool Convention–What I’m Looking Forward to Most

KT Brison of Lit Mama Homeschool is a 2017 HEAV Convention blogger

I’m so excited!  This June will mark my very first homeschool convention even though it will be my 8th anniversary as a homeschooling mom.

Fitting anniversary gift to myself, isn’t it?  I certainly think so.

The Home Educators Association of Virginia (HEAV) Convention runs June 8-10 this year, and I’m driving 9 hours to be there for at least one, if not all, of those days.  I mean, if you could see me dancing around the house, you would totally throw things at me.

But I’m excited.  Because not only do I get to attend HEAV, I get to go as an official blogger of the convention.  Which means I have all kinds of yummy good stuff coming up to entice you to join me.

You will join me, won’t you?

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13 Easter Activities for Kids

This roundup of books, crafts, activites, and printables is sure to have something that will please and entertain your littles for the holiday.

Easter is sneaking up on me.  In fact, I’m sorta trying to ignore it because it’s the same weekend as Littlest’s 12th birthday.

We do lots of fun stuff in our homeschool around Easter, and I don’t imagine that will ever change.  Nature walks, rabbit studies (super easy since we raise rabbits), new chicks for the farmyard… You get it.  Whether Easter is a religious thing for you or not, it offers plenty of learning opportunities.

For instance, every year we try a new method of coloring our eggs.  Since my family absolutely loves what they call “Mom’s famous deviled eggs,” I don’t care if the boys think they’re too old for egg-dying.  I have to have hard-boiled eggs for our Easter meal, so we science (or art) it up to keep it interesting.

If you’re looking for super fun ideas to celebrate and learn about Easter with your littles, well… You know me, I’ve got the goods.

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Reading Poetry with Children

Make poetry fun and exciting for kids

Reading poetry with kids can be a joyful experience, but first you have to get your littles interested. It can be hard, especially since we mamas often cringe at the thought of it. 

Poetry is no longer as popular a form of writing as it once was.   Hundreds of years ago, when not only were books inaccessible but literacy was a skill for only the wealthy (and predominantly male), it was easier to remember historical and other facts if they were set to rhythm and/or rhyme.  People passed down songs, poems, chants, riddles, and other verse as a way to keep their histories intact and their culture united.

Flash forward a few hundred years to when books and literacy became common and reading was the most popular pastime of the age.  Good verse became a competition (luckily for us) and the 19th and early 20th century produced some of the most profound poets in history.  These brilliant men and women  language as a tool to express emotion that might not be polite to express in society, and they spurred each other to write more and to hone a craft that has since fallen out of favor.

I just don’t get why it’s done so.

Because poetry has become a thing we briefly study in school and then often leave behind, it has become harder to understand.  Using figurative language?  Understanding meter?  Carefully choosing alliteration?  Not things the average mama worries about too much in the face of All The Other Things.

But you can make poetry fun for your littles and instill in them a love that will last their lifetimes, not just until they skate past it for the last time in college.  What are the best ways to do that?
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