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India in Salt Dough (Another Way to Geography in Homeschool)

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It’s been a while since I just rambled about our homeschool.  I so enjoy helping you out with ways to get lit into your own days that I forget sometimes you want to know what’s going on with me and my Littles.  One of the fun things about being a homeschool blogger is sharing homeschool experiences, though, so here’s what we’re up to.

As you may know, we decided back in January to cool our jets and take our time studying Asia this semester rather than trying to squeeze in Asia and Africa both.  It was the best homeschool decision I made this year, hands down.  We have really enjoyed truly diving into the history, culture, and geography of each country, as well as including wildlife and geology into each lesson.  The Littles have both exclaimed on various occasions how much fun they’re having and have even begged to keep studying a country once I feel we’re done because they are enjoying it so much.

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What kind of homeschool mama would I be if I didn’t comply with that?!  Oh. Yeah.  That’s why we do this, right?  To get our kids to love learning and look forward to it and all that yummy goodness.  I mean, one of the thousands of reasons.

We’ve been studying India this week and today is our last day.  I thought it would be fun, since India has a pretty diverse topography, to make a salt dough map of the country.  You know by now how much I love salt dough.  It’s cheap, easy, and fun.  It dries on its own.  It’s malleable.  You can do anything with it.  Throw it at your kids if you want (no, before it hardens).  It won’t hurt them.  But if they’re like my kids, they will throw it back, so be prepared for all-out war.  Which can maybe lead to a lesson on warfare?  See, I’m thinking this through.

You can do this for any country, of course, if you really want your littles to remember where different land forms are.  Here’s what we did:

Basic Salt Dough Recipe:

2 cups flour

1 cup salt

1 cup water

Mix the flour and salt in a bowl.  Add the water slowly, stirring as you go.  If the dough gets sticky, add a little more flour.  You want it to resemble play-doh.  Knead the dough for a couple minutes.  Roll it out to remove air or impurities.  Done.

Print out a decent-sized map of India

We used this one.  We printed it, cut it out and put it on a larger piece of paper to use as a guide for our basic landform.

Make your map

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The Littles then used their salt dough to lay out a basic form of India.  Once that was complete, they added the Eastern and Western Ghats, the Himalayas, the Deccan Plateau, the Satpura mountains, the Ganges River, and the Ganges Plain.  They made a little star to mark New Dehli.  Then they painted their creations.

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This project was fun and easy and the Littles left with India’s topography a little more salt-doughed in their heads (instead of cemented.  Get it?).

You would miss my cheesiness if I reined it in.  Admit it.

Love wins,

KT

 

KT Brison
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KT Brison

KT Brison is a former children’s librarian and educator who gave all that up for the most important job in her life—homeschooling her boys.Though she loves the outdoors and rambling around her farm, she can usually be found with her nose in a book. Any book. As long as it has words.
KT Brison
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About KT Brison

KT Brison is a former children’s librarian and educator who gave all that up for the most important job in her life—homeschooling her boys. Though she loves the outdoors and rambling around her farm, she can usually be found with her nose in a book. Any book. As long as it has words.
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10 Comments

  1. This takes me back to geography period in school! Not salt dough, but we used to stick cotton to show where cotton plants are grown … similarly with coffee beans, sugar and what not! what fun!
    swapna recently posted…Practical Mondays… Will be back next week!My Profile

  2. That’s a cool idea-I could have used this in school. I was, and still am, terrible with any kind of geography facts! I do know the shape of the US, though! Hope to see you link up at the Family Joy Linky Party again this Sunday!
    Rachel O. recently posted…Family Joy Linky Party #12My Profile

    • ktbrison@gmail.com

      Yeah, when we study the other side of the world, I am constantly learning things I thought I already knew. Tells you a bit about my own public school experience, and I was a straight-A student. That’s why I include this kind of stuff in our homeschool. I want my littles to Actually Learn. lol

  3. What a great idea to use salt dough for this activity. THanks for linking up with Family Joy Blog Link Up Party.
    Charlene Asay recently posted…Family Joy Blog Link Up Party #12My Profile

  4. I never thought about using salt dough like this before! My son would love this. We recently studied India too. 🙂 So many great things to do with it.

    I’ll have to try this out.
    Sarah recently posted…Garden Creative Play TrayMy Profile

    • ktbrison@gmail.com

      Salt dough is so versatile! I’m always looking for new ways to use it, especially in geography. Is that weird? lol

  5. Why have I not thought to do something this COOL???? I wish you were in California, and I could hire you to teach my children!!!! If I do this, I will tag you in the photos, as my inspiration. I love it.
    storiesofourboys recently posted…What to Expect at a Heart MRIMy Profile

    • ktbrison@gmail.com

      If I were in Cali or you were in Indiana, we could homeschool together! 🙂 🙂 (And thanks! I’m always happiest when coming up with these ideas to make it all FUN!)

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