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Little House on the Prairie Activities for Learning

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Little House on the Prairie Activities for Learning include writing prompts for diary entries, letters, essays, and research plus crafts and other lesson ideas for kids

Little House on the Prairie and its companion books by Laura Ingalls Wilder are, perhaps, some of the greatest fiction you can ever read in your homeschool.  With a firsthand account of U.S. pioneer days and descriptions of so many foods and activities to explore, you could literally plan an entire school year around just these books.

Besides all that, it’s a great story and maybe even greater introductory chapter book that can be enjoyed by all ages.  Whether you’re reading it aloud or assigning it for personal reading, Little House is easy to read and understand with plenty of adventure to keep your kids engaged.  Just a few extra learning tools will have your children learning more about pioneer days than they could anywhere else.

Little House on the Prairie Activities for Learning include writing prompts for diary entries, letters, essays, and research plus crafts and other lesson ideas for kids

Little House on the Prairie Activities

Your child by no means has to do every one of these activities in order to closely read Little House on the Prairie, but I suggest picking several from each category.

Diary entries

  • Pretend you and your family are packing up everything in your house and moving to a strange and, perhaps, dangerous new place and write an entry about how you would feel
  • Write about crossing the iced-over lake and the dangers of it.  What would it be like to hear the ice cracking the night after you crossed it?
  • Pretend you’re Laura and write out all your complaints about crossing the prairie in the wagon with nothing new to look at and nothing to do
  • Pretend you’re Mary and write about crossing the creek that rose so suddenly around them
  • Pretend you’re Laura and write about how it felt to lose Jack at the creek
  • Write about what it would be like to camp out in the open with nothing around but tall grass and a big star-filled sky
  • Pretend you’re Laura and write about how it felt when Jack caught up to them at the camp
  • Write an entry describing the girls’ first day on the prairie–what they did, what they saw, what they heard
  • Describe Mr. Edwards in your own words
  • Pretend you’re Ma and write about how good it is to have a house with walls instead of sleeping in a wagon or tent
  • Pretend you’re Laura and write about the night the wolves circled the house
  • Describe the creek bottoms and all the fun the girls had there
  • Pretend you’re Laura and write about how nice it is to be living in a house again with a fireplace, doors, and a table
  • Pretend you’re Mary and write about the day the Indians came to the house
  • Describe the cattle drive from Laura’s point of view
  • Describe the Indian camp
  • Pretend you’re Laura and write about how it felt to give Baby Carrie your Indian beads
  • Describe what happened when the chimney caught fire
  • Pretend you’re Laura and describe Christmas
  • Describe the work Pa had to do to plant the garden
  • Pretend you’re Laura or Mary and describe the prairie fire
  • Pretend you’re Laura and write about the way the prairie stopped feeling safe
  • Write about how badly Laura wanted the Indian baby
  • Pretend you’re Laura and write about how it feels to have to move on again so soon

Write a letter

  • From Laura to her Grandmother and cousins telling them goodbye and how much she’ll miss them
  • From Laura and Mary to Pa telling him how tired they are of the endless land and sky
  • From Mary to Ma explaining why she doesn’t like fords
  • From Pa to Jack apologizing for not letting him ride across the creek in the cabin
  • From Laura to her Wisconsin cousins telling them about all the animals on the prairie
  • From Laura to Pa telling him about the stars singing along with his fiddle
  • From Pa to Ma telling her why he chose the spot for the house
  • From Laura to Pa telling him how scary it was to be left on the prairie without the wagon
  • From Ma to Pa thanking him for building the cabin
  • From Laura to Ma apologizing for not being there to help catch the log that landed on Ma’s foot
  • From Mr. Edwards to Ma thanking her for the fine supper
  • From Pa to Mr. Edwards thanking him for his help on the house
  • From Laura to Pa thanking him for letting her help him make the door
  • From Pa to Mr. Edwards, thanking him for loaning the nails for the roof
  • From Ma to Laura and Mary thanking them for coming to protect her when the Indians were in the house
  • From Laura to Mr. Edwards telling him why she likes him
  • From Mr. Edwards to Pa thanking him for saving his life when he passed out in the well
  • From Pa to the cowboys thanking them for the cow, the calf, and the slab of beef
  • From the Ingalls to Mrs. Scott thanking her for caring for them when they were ill
  • From Ma to Mr. Edwards thanking him for doing the chores while Pa was gone to town
  • From Ma and the girls to Pa thanking him for buying the window glass
  • From Pa to Mr. Edwards thanking him for bringing the Christmas gifts
  • From the girls to Pa thanking him for their hair combs
  • From Pa to Mr. Scott telling why he won’t wait for the government to run him off the prairie
  • From the girls to Mr. Edwards telling him goodbye and how much they had appreciated him as a neighbor
  • From Pa to Ma explaining to her that they hadn’t wasted a year

Research

  • Research Native Americans of the West–what tribes lived there and how did they live?
  • Research bulldogs and describe what they look like, their history, and how they tend to behave
  • Research mustangs
  • Research the types of trees that grow in Kansas
  • Research meadowlarks and dickcissels
  • Research wolves
  • Research poisonous snakes
  • Research well digging and the types of gas that can fill a well
  • Research cowboys and cattle drives
  • Research the Minnesota massacre Mrs. Scott talked about
  • Research government treaties with Native Americans
  • Research the forced westward migration of Native Americans
  • Research the Osage tribe
  • Research buffalo and buffalo hunts

Essays

  • Write about the differences in travel between the 1860s and today
  • Write about the Ingalls’ assumptions about ‘Indians’ and whether there was any truth to them
  • Write about the prejudice against Native Americans that was prevalent during the time and whether or not attitudes have changed

Arts/Crafts

  • Make a covered wagon
  • Paint a picture of the endless, flat land of Kansas under the enormous sky with the Ingalls’ wagon right in the middle
  • Paint a picture of the stars in the Kansas sky
  • Build a craft stick log cabin
  • Build a craft stick stable
  • Make a paper plate wolf
  • Paint the road to the creek with all the flowers, butterflies, and animals
  • Make a paper bag fireplace
  • Draw Ma’s little china woman
  • Map out the Indian camp
  • Make a bead necklace or bracelet

Food

Miscellaneous

FREE PRINTABLE

Make sure you grab the free printable to do your work on!

Free Printable for Activities for Learning for kids to go with Laura Ingalls Wilder's 3rd book, Little House on the Prairie

Little House on the Prairie is such a sweet book for learning about the American Frontier and all the troubles that went with settling a new place.  With these activities, your kiddos are sure to find it even more fun.

 

 

 

 

Looking for more educational book fun?  Check out:

Building a craft stick log cabin with your kids is just one of the fun Little House on the Prairie activities you can do while you read the children's book.

12 Months of Literary Activities: Little House on the Prairie

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Using Dystopian Literature to Teach American Government

 

KT Brison
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KT Brison

KT Brison is a former children’s librarian and educator who gave all that up for the most important job in her life—homeschooling her boys.Though she loves the outdoors and rambling around her farm, she can usually be found with her nose in a book. Any book. As long as it has words.
KT Brison
Follow me!
GET A FREE PDF OF THIS POST

About KT Brison

KT Brison is a former children’s librarian and educator who gave all that up for the most important job in her life—homeschooling her boys. Though she loves the outdoors and rambling around her farm, she can usually be found with her nose in a book. Any book. As long as it has words.
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