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25 Days of Lit in Your Homeschool: Day 1 Donkeys

 

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Adding Literature to your daily lessons is super easy to do.  A good story can be such a marvelous addition to anything you’re teaching your littles about.  It doesn’t matter if you have primary, middle, or high school level littles, studies have shown that the brain doesn’t make too much differentiation between reading about an experience and Actually Experiencing it.  Which means that an interesting tale can help subject matter stick with your littles for the long haul.  Yet another excellent reason to encourage reading in your homeschool.

I’m starting out this series with donkeys for a variety of reasons, none of them having anything to do with how important donkeys are. 🙂  Mostly just because one of my all-time favorite picture books features a donkey, but also because in the freebies section of this site there’s a free Animal Study worksheet that will go well with these book suggestions.  So without further ado, here are some great books for your littles to read while they’re studying donkeys.

 

Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig

I’ve mentioned William Steig before–he wrote one of my favorite chapter books for littles, Abel’s Island.  Sylvester’s story is very sweet and a good lesson about being careful what you wish for.  The drawings are simple and colorful and the writing is exemplary.  I have many fond memories of pulling this book off the shelf as a child and getting lost in its pages.  Perhaps it doesn’t really teach anything about donkeys.  Who cares?  It is a beautiful tale your littles will thoroughly enjoy, and it will remind them to be grateful for what they have.

 

  The Wonky Donkey by Craig Smith

This is a great read-aloud for littles, with lots of wordplay and hilarity.  The watercolor pictures are soft and lovely, but the depictions of the donkey and the various things that make him wonky are hilarious.  The book comes with a free downloadable song of the story, so that’s something great to get stuck in your head. 🙂  It also provides a lesson on diversity and how being different is a quality we all have and that is not a bad thing.

Donkey-donkey by Roger Duvoisin

This is the story of a donkey who is embarrassed by his ears.  All the other farm animals have beautiful ears; why do his have to be so long?  He sets about following the advice of his animal friends in order to solve his problem (reminiscent of Leo the Lop by Stephen Cosgrove, another all-time fave of mine.  In fact, I have a lop-eared rabbit named Leo).  But when a little girl comes to the farm and admires the donkey’s long ears, he is given a new-found confidence.  The simple pen-and-ink drawings are entertaining and the lesson about loving yourself for who you are is priceless.

The House at Pooh Corner by A.A. Milne

No way can we talk about donkeys here without mentioning Eeyore, the all-time best donkey ever.  Any of Milne’s collections will have him in them, but my favorite Eeyore story is in this one.  If you have littles that love the Disney version, go ahead and find a Disney picture book about Eeyore.  But if you really want to them to know this loveable guy, go for the original.  Lots of lessons here about learning to recognize when people love you and dropping the soul-sucking pessimism.  Plus, he’s just plain Funny!
Teeny Tiny Ernest by Laura T. Barnes

Here’s another tale about loving yourself for who you are (why are donkeys so good for that?!).  In this one, Ernest gets up to all kinds of hijinks while trying to impress his friends with his height.  Of course, he is not tall, so he doesn’t fool anybody.  Soon he realizes that he’s the only one who notices his size–all his friends like him for who he is, not what he looks like.  Another wonderful lesson, told in a fun, engaging way.  Ernest has a whole series of books, too, if your little falls in love with him like we have.
The Last Battle (Book 7 of The Chronicles of Narnia) by C.S. Lewis

This final chapter in the Narnia books stars Puzzle the donkey as one of the antagonists.  Puzzle is a bit dense but has a good heart.  He is the faithful sidekick of Shift, an ape who has it out for the Narnians.  Shift manipulates Puzzle into carrying out his orders, including risking his life to steal the skin of a lion from the Caldron Pool, then wearing it to imitate Aslan.  In the end, Puzzle does what is right and, after a short conversation with Aslan, is admitted into Aslan’s country.  As in all the Narnia books, there are lots of lessons here about how to be a good person, but particularly in Puzzle’s case, how to think for oneself and not allow peer pressure to influence decisions.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare

This is one of Shakespeare’s funniest plays and Bottom, whose head gets transformed into that of a donkey’s by Puck, is the funniest character.  He is silly and foolish, and nothing about his antics ever really redeems him.  It makes this a great play with which to introduce your littles to Shakespeare.  Plus, I’m pretty sure you can get it for free on Kindle or you can read it online for free here.

Animal Farm by George Orwell

You can’t have a group of political farm animals without including a stubborn donkey.  In fact, Benjamin the Donkey is so stubborn he absolutely refuses to get excited about the rebellion.  He is the oldest animal on the farm and kind of an Eeyore with a brain.  Very cynical.  Because he is longer-lived than the other animals, he sees the rebellion and the new regime as passing fads.  He’s pretty sure he’s going to live to see what comes next, so he just can’t drum up any enthusiasm for all the plots and machinations.  He’s one of my favorite characters simply for his detached amusement about all the goings-on.

Pick one or more of these books to add to a class about donkeys and you’re sure to perk up your littles’ interest.  Even just reading excerpts from the chapter books or the play can give your child a little insight into what we humans think of the donkey’s character.  Silly, foolish, stubborn, fiercely loyal… Yeah, that describes our donkey, too. 🙂

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Love wins,

KT

 

 

 

 

6 Ways to Have a Fabulous Fourth of July Celebration!

With Independence Day coming up, we took the day off from science today to prepare.  Following are some craft, lesson, and food ideas to get your littles involved in your July Fourth celebration and pretty it up a bit.

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We’ll start with crafts.  Here are two that are super simple to make and will add a little spark to any celebration.

Miniature American Flags

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These are so fun to make and can be used for various things.  We have used them for coasters, glued them to the front of jars to hold plastic ware on the food table, and attached them to sticks for the kiddos to wave around.

Materials:

IMG_20150702_112839655For each flag you will need

8 craft sticks

red, white, and blue tempera or craft paint

glue

Instructions:

1.  Cut or break one of your craft sticks in half, making sure the pieces are as equal in length as you can get them.  These are what you will attach the other sticks together with.  Set them aside.

2.  You will only be painting one side of the remaining craft sticks.  Paint 1/3 of 4 of the sticks blue.  I put the sticks together and mark them with a pencil so it’s all even.

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IMG_20150702_115539114Warning: If you’re using tempera paint, you will have to do 2 or more coats, especially on the white.

3.  Alternate painting the remaining 2/3 of those four sticks red and white.

IMG_20150702_1205389154.  Paint 2 of the remaining sticks red and the final one white.

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  1. Once the paint has dried, turn the sticks over, being sure that your blue field will be on the left-hand side and your top stick is blue and red.  Also, alternate the red and white sticks so you have a true-looking flag.  Line them up so that they’re straight at all edges.

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  1. Now it’s time for the stick you cut in half.  Run a line of glue along one side of one piece and place it about 1/2 inch in from the end.  Be sure it touches all 7 of the flag sticks.  Now glue the other piece the same distance from the other end.  It should look like this:

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7.  Now that you have assembled your flag, you can paint a white star in the center of your blue field, or make white dots to represent whatever number of stars you want to place on your flag.

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That’s it!  Cute and simple! (You can see that Littlest forgot to make sure he started at the top with a blue and red stick.  Make sure you don’t do that!)

Fireworks Pom Poms

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These are also really easy to make, though younger littles may need a bit of help with the scissors.  Also versatile, we’ve used them for centerpieces, individual decor, or twirly toys for kiddos to replace sparklers.  You can make a bunch of red, white, and blue pom poms, or you can mix up the colors for variety.  Also, you can make the pom poms a little fuller by adding another strip or two of crepe paper, but don’t use too much–they stop looking like fireworks and start resembling flowers.

IMG_20150702_121049559Materials:

Red, white, and blue crepe paper

Small dowel rods or kabob sticks

Scissors

Tape

(Cat is optional!)

Instructions:

1.  Cut a 6-inch strip of each color of crepe paper.

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  1. Stack them atop one another.

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  1. Fold the stacked crepe paper in half once.  Fold in half again.

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  1. With your scissors, cut thin strips on one long edge of the folded paper.  You should leave about a 1/2-inch strip along the bottom for attaching it to your dowel rod or kabob stick.

IMG_20150702_121930320It should look like this:

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5.  Place one end of the dowel rod or kabob stick onto the uncut edge of the paper.  Roll the paper up from the short edge, making sure your cut edges are above the stick, which you are rolling up in the paper.

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6.  Tape the bottom edge of the pom pom around the stick.

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7.  With your fingers, fluff the cut edges until they resemble a firework.

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Also simple and cute!

Learning About Independence Day

Adding a short lesson to your preparations helps your littles remember why we’re celebrating this particular day.  It’s not just fireworks and potluck suppers!  There is a great selection of Independence Day poetry here, including Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Concord Hymn and Henry Longfellow’s Paul Revere’s Ride.  I remember memorizing Paul Revere’s Ride in the 5th grade, and it still pops into my head from time to time in quiet moments. It has amazing rhythm.  To save you some time, here is a great American poem by Walt Whitman that reminds us of the diversity of people who live in this country and how they contribute to its success.

I Hear America Singing
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Walt Whitman (from Leaves of Grass, first published in the 1867 edition)
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I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear;
Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and strong;
The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam,
The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work;
The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck;
The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as he stands;
The wood-cutter’s song—the ploughboy’s, on his way in the morning, or at the noon intermission, or at sundown;
The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or of the girl sewing or washing—
Each singing what belongs to her, and to none else;
The day what belongs to the day—
At night, the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,
Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs.

That Whitman.  What a genius.

Product Details

There a several great children’s books to help littles understand more about the 4th of July.  Apple Pie 4th of July by Janet S. Wong celebrates our independence and our diversity.  It’s about a Chinese-American girl who is disappointed that her family is being so Un-American as to make Chinese food for their 4th of July celebration.  But she learns her own lesson about what America is in the end.

Product DetailsThe Journey of the One and Only Declaration of Independence by Judith St. George is a brightly-colored, well-researched book about the many places that document has called home throughout our history.

The Signers: 56 Stories behind the Declaration of Independence by Dennis B. Fradin is good for older kids who want to learn more aboutProduct Details how the document came into being.  And because there is a story for each of the Declaration signers, your littles can pick and choose who they want to learn about.

If you would rather just read the Declaration with your littles and discuss it at your own pace, you can find an online copy of it here.  The site even has a printer-friendly version.

 

Food

Red White and Blue Tiramisu

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If you have a tiramisu dish, this red, white and blue yummy goodness is sure to make a beautiful smash!  I don’t have a finished pic for you because I’m not making it until Saturday, but hopefully you’ll get the idea.  This simple dish is a great way to sneak fresh fruit in on your littles if they don’t normally dive on it the minute you get home from the store like mine do.

Ingredients:

2 21 ounce cans cherry pie filling

2-3 cups fresh blueberries, to taste (and visual effect)

8 ounces fresh strawberries

2 5.25-ounce packages instant vanilla pudding

1 8-ounce tub cool whip

(Again, lazy cat optional.  Though I don’t recommend it for this particular project.)

Directions:

1.  Start by making the pudding according to package directions, then putting it in the fridge to thicken.

  1. Slice your strawberries and set aside.

3.  Spread both cans of cherry pie filling on the bottom of your dish.  Top with pudding.

4.  For your blue layer, add blueberries until they can be easily seen through the sides of the dish.

  1. Top with whole tub of cool whip.

  2. Arrange strawberries in any design you want atop the cool whip.

Easy, yummy and (somewhat) good for you, this dish is sure to be a crowd pleaser.

  Strawberry-Peach Shakes

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For a fun way to cool off from the July heat, make these shakes and watch the smiles break forth.

Ingredients:

14 ounce sliced peaches, undrained

8-12 ounces fresh strawberries

1/2 cup milk

1/2 to 3/4 of a 48 oz tub of vanilla ice cream, depending on desired thickness

Directions:

1.  Pour peaches with syrup into food processor or blender

  1. De-stem strawberries and add them to the peaches

  2. Add milk and ice cream

  3. Pulse until mixture is thick and creamy

That’s all there is to it!  My littles beg me daily to make these yummy shakes.  I hope you and your littles enjoy them as much as we do.

There you have it, beautiful readers.  My favorite ways to make the 4th of July amazing for all of us.  I hope there’s lots here you can use to enhance your celebrations.

Happy Independence Day!

Love wins,

KT

20 Fave Female Characters for People Under 20

Let me preface this post by saying coming up with this list was Hard.  Harder, even, than choosing 101 books for Recommended Reading.  I have been reading (constantly) since I was 4, and I have met many interesting and awe-inspiring characters in all that time.  But I was thinking about the kinds of characters young girls can relate to and look up to, and hoping to give you a peek into the world of awesome characters so you can recommend them to your own littles.  Or enjoy them for yourself like I do.  I admitted in the comments of my last post that I am a huge fan of YA books right now and tend to read them for the most part these days.  The YA world has opened up to include so many genres.  When I was a kid YA meant romance stories or stories that taught you about your period or fluff like Sweet Valley High.  Remember that series? Blah.

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There are many more options these days and some of them are even appropriate for chucking the reading level.   Between those options and the plethora of children’s books out there, I’ve picked a list of twenty female characters for your girls (and boys) to fall in love with and admire.

1. Jo from Little Women by Louisa May Alcott LittleWomen4

Jo is one of the most down-to-earth, nose-to-the-grindstone characters ever written.  Especially if your daughter has an interest in writing, this is a character she should read about.  Jo writes because she Has To, she doesn’t have a choice.  She doesn’t let the social norms of her time hold her back.  She knows what she is supposed to do in life and she does it.  The most interesting thing about Jo is how well she knows herself.  Instead of rushing into marriage with Laurie, the cute boy next door, she realizes she is meant for bigger things.  She knows she’s hurting him, but she turns him down.  Why?  Because that’s not where her heart is.  If you want someone to teach your littles how to be true to themselves, Jo’s your girl.

2. Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Regardless of what we may feel about how the films turned out (angry and betrayed, anyone?), the book character of Katniss is strong and loyal and never gives up.  She Believes In Family.  When her little sis gets called up to participate in the Hunger Games, Katniss doesn’t hesitate to volunteer to take her place.  It puts her in bad situation that only spirals.  The Hunger Games is one of my favorite trilogies ever written because we watch this girl go from surviving to leading and even though others don’t always understand her motives, we as readers know they all stem from the same place–she loves her family and will do anything to protect them, even go to war.  What other reason could there be to cause so much ruckus?

3. Mary Lennox from The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Here’s a little girl who has lost everything–not that she really had anything to begin with.  Her neglectful parents have died in India and left her without a home.  The only place she has to go is her uncle’s mysterious manor in England.  Mary starts out a lonely, distant, off-putting brat and ends up opening her heart, finally, for the first time in her life, all because of a garden she finds locked up on the estate.  She makes friends.  She starts to Care.  If you want your children to see how different the world is when you care about people and are kind to them, this is the book.  Mary learns to think beyond herself and turns her tragedy into an epic of hope.  She is also the poster child for determination.  Turning that garden into something useful and appealing takes a lot of work and willpower.  I wish she’d come work on my garden.

4. Winnie Foster from Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbit

Winnie has a very small world at the beginning of this book.  Her parents are more overprotective than I am.  She isn’t allowed out of her fenced yard, has never explored the woods just outside the gate, has never disobeyed the rules.  Until she decides to disobey the rules.  The adventure that follows teaches her more about herself than she could ever have learned had she continued to be obedient.  Winnie is brave.  She is fiercely loyal.   She puts herself out there for something she feels is right and saves the day.  If I ever get wrongfully imprisoned, I hope Winnie Foster is around.  Winnie could teach your littles a thing or two about how to handle new situations while keeping their heads.

5. Ramona Quimby from Beezus and Ramona (and other books) by Beverly Cleary

Let’s face it.  Ramona’s indomitable spirit lives in every single one of us. Sure, she’s obnoxious.  But the underlying reasons, laid out so well in Ramona the Pest, are completely understandable.  She’s young.  The youngest.  It’s hard sometimes to get attention and every child wants attention.  She also wants Every. Thing. To be fair.  So even though we know fairness sometimes can’t come into a situation (such as what she is allowed to do compared to what Beezus is allowed to do), we find ourselves cheering her on.  By the time Ramona reaches Age 8, she is starting to come to grips with her feelings about the world.  She realizes that while her family is not perfect, neither is she, and she starts to understand that sometimes things just aren’t going to be nice.  Ramona is awesome for belly laughs, but she also shows kids that they aren’t the only ones in the world with mixed feelings about how things work.

6. Laura Ingalls from the Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Ah, Laura.  My childhood hero and best-est book friend.  Not only did I enjoy the books, I never missed an episode of the television program based on them.  Laura was a feisty little scamp.  She taught me how to be a farmer.   I was a city girl back then with a longing for the country life I never wanted to admit to Anybody.  (Fortunately I grew out of that, or I wouldn’t have this incredible farm.)  She taught me how to get even with the evil Nellies of the world.  She taught me about honesty, appreciating what I have, and how awesome it is to be a teacher.  Her relationship with her father was so many light years away from my own that it gave me hope and showed me the kind of man I would look for when I grew up.  Sure, these books are great for teaching your littles about pioneer days.  But they’re also great for little girls starting to find their way in the world and needing someone to emulate.

7. Alice from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

I don’t know if it’s Alice so much as Carroll’s amazing skill with words that makes me include her in this list.  Alice is curious and impulsive and even though Carroll shows us through her changing size that she is too old for such childish adventures, she refuses to let go of them just yet.  How many of us have struggled to hold onto childhood in some way?  (One of the reasons I love having Littles is that they keep my imagination fresh and feeling young.)  Like Winnie Foster, Alice begins as a polite rule follower.  She is concerned for the approval of adults and works hard not to appear ignorant in front of them.  However, she is also pretty self-absorbed and tends to frighten or offend others without meaning to.  At least she always apologizes for it.  The cool thing about Alice is watching her find out who she really is through all her misadventures.  And Johnny Depp plays a dope Mad Hatter, so watch the film.

8. Veruca Salt from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

Now here’s a character I love to hate.  Veruca is the antithesis of what I want to be.  And yet, I love to read about her.  She makes me laugh; she’s so absurd.  Veruca is one in the list of characters who get punished by Willie Wonka because of their bad behavior.  In Veruca’s case, it is being spoiled and demanding and thinking she can get whatever she wants from whomever is around her that gets her tossed down a garbage chute.  She’s great for teaching your littles how Not To Behave.  And then there’s the overall theme about good behavior being rewarded while bad behavior is punished.  Win-win.

9. Nancy Drew from the Nancy Drew Mysteries by Carolyn Keene

I discovered Nancy Drew when I was 8 or 9, and even though I loved the mysteries, my favorite part was the glimpse I got into the teenage world.  Nancy and George and Bess had Boyfriends, something I couldn’t imagine having while at the same time couldn’t wait to experience.  Nice, polite, respectful boyfriends, too, who totally understood when the girls had to traipse off to unknown parts for a little crime-solving.  Also, Nancy Drew Used Her Brain without caring that it was the early 1980s when I was reading her and the women’s lib movement was still fresh enough that our mothers still encouraged us not to let boys know we were smarter than them, because boys didn’t like that.  I’ve mentioned in an earlier post that I went through a period when I wanted to be a detective, and I think Nancy Drew contributed to that.  Strong, smart, brave, and sassy, Nancy Drew is an awesome character for little girls.

10. Princess Irene from The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonaldprincess goblin

My mama brought me back a copy of this book from one of her trips to Canada for the Shakespeare Festival in Stratford.  It transported me.  It was perhaps my first full-length fairy tale/fantasy and Irene was one of the first true feminine heroes I read about.  She lived in a castle, and that was cool, but she was a regular girl and that was cooler.  And what girl wouldn’t like to have a melted star in each of her blue eyes?  (Or blue eyes, because ya know, mine are brown, and I think I would have rocked blue eyes with my dark hair. haha)  Polite, considerate, and truthful, Irene insists on keeping her promises (and we all know we shouldn’t make promises unless we intend to keep them).  Not only does Irene teach these attributes, her spiritual journey is full of allegory, making hers an even more pleasing adventure.  Thanks, Mama, for bringing her to me. 🙂

11. Ani from The Goose Girl by Shannon Hale

Shannon Hale is one of my all-time favorite YA authors.  She is brilliant at imagery and pace.  The Goose Girl is, of course, based on the fairy tale, but there are such great additions that Hale was able to turn the setting into a trilogy that is pretty spectacular.  Ani can communicate with animals, a magical gift she is taught to control by her aunt.  When she grows up, Ani finds that people distrust her magic and her mother forces her to journey far from home in order to marry a foreign king.  As she travels, her lady-in-waiting, Selia, turns on her, using her escort’s distrust of Ani’s magic to supplant Ani with Selia.  So Ani has to end her journey like a peasant, ending up getting a job as the king’s goose girl while Selia pretends to be the princess come to marry the king.  Ani is kind, though, and generous, and strong, and eventually the king discovers her quite by accident and all comes right in the end.  If you’re looking for a way to give your daughter a fairy tale with a realistic heroine, you can’t go wrong with The Goose Girl.

12. Cassia from Matched by Ally Condie

My favorite thing about Cassia is her love and devotion to the written word.  She lives in a dystopian society where every single choice about her life is made by The Society.  Her job is chosen.  Even her spouse is chosen in a fancy ceremony.  But a mistake is made, and Cassia ends up having to choose between her best friend, Xander, and Ky, the boy who teaches her about words.  She is confused because The Society never makes mistakes, yet her feelings for Ky are insurmountable.  The beauty of that love is that it makes her question everything about The Society and how bad it really is to have all our choices taken from us.  Cassia’s willingness to follow her heart and trust her instincts is another way to show your littles how to be brave and stand up for what is right.  And it’s a rollicking adventure.

13. Leslie Burke from Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Who couldn’t love a girl who is artistic, creative, and imaginative and who loves both to read books And play outdoors?  Leslie Burke is one of my all-time faves because she believes in the magic of her imagination and because she knows what it means to be a true friend.  And she doesn’t watch television.  What’s not to love?!  Her death is heartrending, but it is also a good illustration of how friendship is a legacy that stays with us and gives our lives beauty.  Paterson wrote the story to help her own son deal with the death of a friend, so it is both poignant and sensitive.  And Leslie is unforgettable, even for us lowly readers.

14. Charlotte from Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White 

I know, there’s a bit of a theme here about girls who like words.  But Charlotte is one of the reasons I love spiders.  When we moved to the farm I told Martin I wanted Charlotte’s web with all the animals and he happily obliged me.  We’ve had pigs, geese, goats, cows, ducks, and even more (but thankfully no rats).  I even made a sign out of an old wreath and that fake spiderweb you can get around Halloween that said, “Some Pig.”  Because Charlotte rocks.  She’s intelligent.  She’s good with words.  She’s compassionate.  She’s strong.  She’s generous.  She becomes a mother.  Um… if your littles haven’t read this yet, read it to them now!

15. Abilene Tucker from Moon Over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool

Abilene is so awesome.  Her rough-and-tumble approach to life reminds me of myself in childhood.  So curious, so vibrant, so unwilling to let mysteries remain mysteries.  I didn’t read this book until a year or so ago, but Abilene quickly captured my heart.  She’s a good character for teaching your littles how to handle new situations and how to follow through with determination and heart.  Plus, this book is great when you’re studying either the Depression or WWI, as the story flips back and forth between the time periods.  And the writing is superb.

16. Grandma Dowdel from A Year Down Yonder by Richard Peck

Oh, Grandma Dowdel.  You crazy old bat.  You made us laugh.  You made us cringe.  You were… one smart cookie with a lot to offer.  Since the story is told from the point of view of young Mary Alice (a supreme character in her own right), Grandma Dowdel is at first an awkward, embarrassing mystery.  The Littles and I were fortunate to have picked this book up before its prequel, A Long Way from Chicago, so we appreciated Grandma’s nuances without having already been introduced to her.  By the end of the book, Mary Alice has recognized the deep and abiding love that is inherent in Grandma Dowdel, and the reader has walked the zany, hilarious path to that conclusion with her.   I could read about Grandma Dowdel all day long.  What a cool old lady.  May I be that cool when it comes time for grandkids.

17. Jane Eyre from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Jane is another tough bird.  After being sent off to a dreadful orphanage by her dreadful aunt, she survives to become a governess for the incomprehensible Mr. Rochester, perhaps the most romantic figure in literature, ever.  Of course, all the truly Gothic freakiness and mystery is part of the charm, but Jane’s spirit and her way of dealing with all the oddness thrown her way are the real stars.  Maybe save it for tween-teen girls, depends on your own feelings about the book, but Jane is definitely someone every girl should meet at some point while they’re still young enough to be influenced.

18. Scout from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Scout… Proud spirit, defender of right, lover of Atticus and Jem.  Hands down the greatest female character ever written.  To read about the Worst Human Flaw Ever (prejudice) through the eyes of Scout is to truly see how preposterous prejudice is.  We all know that children aren’t born with prejudices.  Rather, they are taught that revolting emotion.  Beyond that, Scout is sassy, fun, and full of spirit.  There’s a reason Harper Lee only ever had to publish one book until this year.  And a reason I am counting the days till July 14th, when I can get hold of the new one…

19. Tally from Uglies by Scott Westerfield

The amazing thing about Tally is that she’s written by a dude.  That said, if you haven’t read The Uglies series, go do so.  It’s such a cool way to say that we shouldn’t be so focused on appearance, that sometimes our flaws are what make us beautiful, and what we look like is not nearly as important as who we are.  Tally is a thoughtful person who has her views on the world turned upside down by her new friend, Shay.  Tally has been waiting her whole life to turn 16 and get the operation that will make her a Pretty, but Shay doesn’t want to be made Pretty.  She wants more from life.  What follows is brilliant dystopian ruination in which, once more, we are made to realize that we really are better off having choices–both in what we do and how we look.  And Tally is one kick-butt heroine throughout the series.

20. Hazel from The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Hmm.  If you’ve read this book, you know how just thinking about it can overwhelm you.  Hazel is dying.  Of cancer.  And she is the wisest, funniest, snarkiest, most amazing creature.  She knows all about hope and the lack of it.  She falls in love anyway.  She says herself that she is a ticking time-bomb, set to crush everyone she lets in.  She lets Gus in anyway.  She Lives While She Can and that in itself is a lesson for all of us.  She is brave and strong and true.  Even my beautiful husband says Hazel’s story is the best love story he’s ever seen.  Sorry.  I can’t find enough words.  Read it.  Let your littles read it.  Especially if they know someone surviving cancer.

As I said, I had to leave characters off this list to narrow it down to 20.  Please feel free to add your own favorite female characters in the comments.  And tomorrow?  Well, tomorrow we’ll celebrate the boys.  In the meantime, any of the books on this list would make great summer reading.  So have fun.

Love wins,

KT