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25 Days of Lit in Your Homeschool: Day 5 Owls

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So elusive that even if you live in the country mostly all you get is a ghostly hoo-hooo in the very late evenings or very early mornings, owls are amazing creatures.  The sheer size of the great horned owl is awe-inducing.  Here on the farm, we become aware of their presence when a chicken or rabbit mysteriously disappears overnight.  I don’t know if I’ve told you this, but we only cage our rabbits when they are pregnant.  We release mama and babies into the yard when the babies are about half grown.  I love rabbits.  I can’t stand to see them in cages.  So we have a large fenced area by the barn where they are able to dig burrows and nibble grass and really live.  Mostly without fear of predators.  But the downside of all that freedom is that owls can swoop into the yard at night and snatch them up.  It doesn’t happen often, but it happens.  And don’t even talk to me about raccoons.

Owls make for a great study.  There are so many books about them, so many characters based on them… you can even purchase owl pellets to examine in your homeschool.  If you don’t know what those are, they’re the clump of bones and fur an owl spits back out after it eats an animal whole, keeping only the good stuff to digest.  There are so many amazing things to do when studying owls.  So here are a few really good books to include in your owl study.  You know, to make them seem less like rabbit thieves and more like the majestic creatures they really are.

 

Owl Moon by Jane Yolen

Jane Yolen is one of my favorite authors.  She writes so man different things for children, she can’t be put into a genre.  Owl moon is about a father who takes his child ‘owling.’ That is, looking for owls under the moonlight on a clear winter night.  One of the things I love about this book is that it is told from the child’s point of view in the first person, and it never reveals the gender of the child.  So whether you have a boy or a girl, he or she can relate to the child as his or her own gender.  A cool touch to a truly lovely book.  The story is told in free verse, and the imagery is there even without the simple, haunting illustrations by John Schoenherr.  Just don’t be surprised if your little asks you to go owling.   So dress warm.

 

Owl and Moon by Heather Swick

This cute book, told in rhyme, has perhaps the most expressive owl I’ve ever seen.  The grumpy guy hates being the only person up at night.  He wants a friend.  But the is moon only other thing awake all night like he is.  Thing is, he’s stuck down here, and the moon is stuck up there.  What’s an owl to do?  I think your littles will enjoy looking at illustrations as much as they will enjoy the story, and this book definitely reminds them how different life is for nocturnal animals.

 

The Owl Who Became the Moon by Jonathan London

This beautiful book is one of our favorites.  The Littles made me read it to them over and over for years.  Not that I minded.  It is a slow-paced, sparsely worded poem set against a backdrop of gorgeous illustrations.  It’s actually a great bedtime story because of its pace, but don’t doubt that it will engage your littles any time of the day.  It makes the owl even more mysterious than we already think it, and a little mystique is a good thing.

 

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh by Robert C. O’Brien

The owl in this tale is mean and frightening (but he would be from the eyes of a mouse.  Mouse is a delicacy for owls.) but he also Has The Answers, as any good owl would do.  I don’t know why owls became a symbol of wisdom in our culture, but it makes for some interesting characters.  Like the Tootsie Roll Pop owl.  Who is very cool.  This book could spark discussions about owl diet and habitat, and maybe even get your littles interested in researching the folklore about owls.  Not too shabby for a story about a bunch of rats.

 

The Guardians of Ga’Hoole by Kathryn Lasky

This is the first book in a series of 15.  We read it several years ago, and were fascinated by all the information we picked up from it about owls.  It actually sparked our first owl pellet dissection, and we were just reading it for fun.  It’s about Soren, a young owlet who gets pushed out of the nest by his greedy older brother (my doves do this, so there’s really a basis in reality).  Rather than getting mauled by a predator, Soren gets picked up by mysterious owls who take him to St. Aegolius Academy for Orphaned Owls, and there his adventures begin.  When he realizes there is something very wrong in the school, Soren and his friend have to fight against the teachings and discover what is going on.  Lots of owl science here, as well as a look at human nature and politics.

 

Hoot by Carl Hiaasen

This amazing environmetally-charged book is about Roy, who moves to Florida and discovers a mysterious running boy.  He follows the boy, curious as to where he’s always running.  What follows is an adventure in anti-development.  Roy and the running boy team up to stop developers from destroying the habitat of burrowing owls.   This is great for discussions about being kind to the environment and protecting habitats and species that sometimes get pushed aside in the name of progress.  Plus, it’s big fun, and your littles will enjoy the antics of the boys as they try to stop the construction of a new pancake house.

I could probably go on about owl books all day.  I mean, I didn’t even mention my favorite owl, Owl.  But if you don’t know how much I love the Pooh books, then you need to subscribe and keep reading.  (It’ll probably get annoying, even. haha)

Love wins,

KT

25 Days of Lit in Your Homeschool Day 3: Water

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We haven’t seen the sun here in 2 weeks or more.  I am not exaggerating–it has rained at least a little every day, and there has been no blue sky to speak of.  It is a strange thing indeed to be feeling the onset of winter blues in the middle of summer.  Normally, we would be at the beginning of our summer drought–a period of about 2 months when we pray for rain.  Not this year.  This year we have flash flood watches every day.  Our yard is starting to resemble a jungle because even when it’s not raining, the grass is too wet to mow. We’ve only been able to get in the pool once in the last two weeks and it spilled over the edges when we added our bodies to it because it is overfull.  It. Is. Wet.  So I thought it appropriate for our books today to be about water.  All kinds of water.  Because, come on, we’re drowning here anyway!

There are so many different ways to teach about water.  Pond studies, river studies, ocean studies, rain cycle studies…  I could probably keep listing, but you get the picture.  With that in mind, here are several books you can use to add literature to a few different types of water study.

Water Dance by Thomas Locker

We love this book.  It takes you through all of water’s paths in non-rhyming verse, using delicious words like sparkling, plunging, roaring, glistening, and spiraling.  The watercolor illustrations are so yummy you will fall in love with water all over again, be it in the form of rain, mist, mountain stream, or the sea.  This book is excellent, and I do mean Excellent, for helping to introduce the water cycle to your littles.  It gives them a visual for just about everything water goes through on our lovely planet.
The Water Hole by Graeme Base

This book does many things–it’s a counting book and a puzzle book, and at first glance you might think it suitable only for the very young.  But the illustrations are Absolutely Gorgeous, and it reminds littles of just how many species depend on water and what might happen if that water disappears. If you are studying ponds or other types of water holes, or if you are studying our dwindling freshwater supply, this book will make a good addition.  Plus, you can get this super-awesome coloring book to go with it.
Amos & Boris by William Steig

Another brilliant book by Steig, this one is about a mouse who falls overboard in the ocean and is rescued by a whale.  It’s a true lesson in kindness and helping one’s fellow… mammal.  In pure Steig style, there’s plenty of high sea adventure, and eventually our little mouse gets to repay his big friend’s favor.  This one would be a fun addition to any ocean study.
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell

This brilliantly uplifting adventure is sure to please any little.  Based on a true story, it tells the tale of Karana, a native Californian who lives alone for 18 years on an island in the Pacific Ocean.  In true Robinson Crusoe fashion, she makes a home for herself and builds a life.  So many things to learn from this book, I can’t even list them.  Speaking of Crusoe,
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

Another tale of survival on an isolated island, this book also has a lot of chapters about the ocean itself–its dangers, its beauties, how a person can fall in love with it and want to live on it.  It’s one of our favorite books because it is so full of adventure and truly sound ideas for surviving on one’s own.  It would be a brilliant addition to an ocean study.
Downriver by Will Hobbs

If you’re studying rivers, this adventurous tale about a group of teens who steal a raft and take off down the Colorado River will be a good addition.  There are wonderful descriptions of the river and the Grand Canyon, and lots of lessons about life and growth in this one.  Even if you have a reluctant reader, this one is sure to please.

Learning about water and all its guises can make for a long lesson.  Give that lesson a bit of fun with one or more of these books, and your little will remember what he’s learned as he relates it to the literature.  You can’t beat that.

Oh, and maybe could you do a sun dance for me?

Love wins,

KT

Day One: Donkeys

Day Two: Summer

25 Days of Lit in Your Homeschool: Day 2 Summer

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Ah, summer.  That golden time when the clock seems to slow, the morning brightens earlier, the night darkens later, and the day is filled with so much possibility we feel we might burst.  It is like that for littles, and it is like that for us as adults.  School gets a little lazier.  The rules ease up a bit.  There is fun to be had, and we are going to have it.

Learning about what makes summer Summer–which hemisphere it is visiting and what the sun and the earth are doing to cause it–is an eye-opener for most littles.  All they know is that suddenly it is warm enough to play outside every day, even in the rain, and the swimming pools are open, and popsicles are sweeter on the tongue when you’re sweating buckets.  A good lesson about summer might include what animals are lurking about that we don’t see in winter, what insects are taking our breath with their beauty or just flat annoying us, what the trees are doing to cause All That Green.  And of course, we must have books to help us celebrate.  Here’s a short list of books you can include to help your littles get the full effect of marvelous, magical summer.
Frog and Toad-The Complete Collection by Arnold Lobel

Thank you, Arnold Lobel.  These stories and their illustrations are so lyrical and daydream-inducing.  They make me want to be a toad.  They probably fostered my love of amphibians.  There are several stories here that encompass summer and will leave your littles hankering to get outside and explore.  Summer and The Garden spring immediately to mind.  If you have any of these books on hand, definitely add them to your lessons about summer.  They will show littles a bit of what summer is about, and the stories always drive home the value of true friendship.
Georgia Music by Helen V. Griffith

This book.  This one.  The watercolor illustrations capture a southern summer so gorgeously your little will get lost in them (and so will you).  The story, about a little girl who spends a summer in Georgia with her grandfather and learns the music of nature as well as the music he makes on his mouth organ, will melt your heart.  When her grandfather is forced by old age to move up north with the girl and her mother, he misses the Georgia music terribly.  So the little girl plays a mouth organ to recreate the sounds he misses and eases his heart.  Beautiful.  The bonus is the reminder to your child to listen to the crickets and the frogs and the birds and all the stunning music in her own backyard.

 

Summer Days and Nights by Wong Herbert Yee

This brightly-colored book tells of an entire summer day and night through the eyes of a little girl who is looking to entertain herself.  The gentle rhyme of the book adds to the lazy, summer-time feel.  She goes on a picnic, takes a swim, sips lemonade, and catches a butterfly.  She sees an owl and hears a frog.  There are lots of reminders about how cool it is to be outside in summer and what your little might run into if he gets out there.  Lots of fun.
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

I know, I recommend this book For Everything.  But come on, what better summer novel is there?  I mean, ever?  The scene where Atticus has to take care of the diseased dog pops into my head any time I hear the phrase ‘dog days.’  Jem and Scout playing with Dill in the backyard?  Um, hello!  Summer!  I’ve sung the praises of the many lessons of this book many times over, especially in my favorite characters posts, so all I’ll say here is that it is a truly amazing addition to any lesson plan, and it would certainly help put your littles in the summertime mood.
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

Hello, more frogs and toads.  And water rats and badgers and moles and a variety of other animals to befriend.  This book not only opens up the imagination to summer, it gives you a great jumping-off place for an animal study.  The whole world of the animals is centered around a river, which gives you an opening for a water study.  The story is magical–again about the value of friendship–but also funny and entertaining.  You can’t really go wrong with this gem.
Watership Down by Richard Adams

Another of my all-time faves, Watership Down is an engaging story about a group of rabbits who venture away from their warren to find a new home.  A good way to teach your kids about courage and doing what’s right as well as about loyalty, this book is one adventure after another.  It makes a wonderful read-aloud.  My Littles loved it from the first page to the last and still create games around the story (we read it together 3 years ago).  It gives an insightful look at both the habits of animals and human nature that will stay with your littles for a long time to come.  In fact, my entire extended family still says that someone has ‘gone tharn’ when they are shocked or frightened into stillness.  Read the book.  You’ll get it.

I just have to say here, that even if you aren’t studying summer, read all these books with your littles.  At least 4 of them make it on my top 20 list.  Maybe even top 10.  And you know as well as I do that my list of favorite books is probably thousands-long, so that is really saying something.

Love wins,

KT

If you’re looking for a way to add lit to lessons about donkeys and you missed that post, take a look at Day One.

25 Days of Lit in Your Homeschool: Day 1 Donkeys

 

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Adding Literature to your daily lessons is super easy to do.  A good story can be such a marvelous addition to anything you’re teaching your littles about.  It doesn’t matter if you have primary, middle, or high school level littles, studies have shown that the brain doesn’t make too much differentiation between reading about an experience and Actually Experiencing it.  Which means that an interesting tale can help subject matter stick with your littles for the long haul.  Yet another excellent reason to encourage reading in your homeschool.

I’m starting out this series with donkeys for a variety of reasons, none of them having anything to do with how important donkeys are. 🙂  Mostly just because one of my all-time favorite picture books features a donkey, but also because in the freebies section of this site there’s a free Animal Study worksheet that will go well with these book suggestions.  So without further ado, here are some great books for your littles to read while they’re studying donkeys.

 

Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig

I’ve mentioned William Steig before–he wrote one of my favorite chapter books for littles, Abel’s Island.  Sylvester’s story is very sweet and a good lesson about being careful what you wish for.  The drawings are simple and colorful and the writing is exemplary.  I have many fond memories of pulling this book off the shelf as a child and getting lost in its pages.  Perhaps it doesn’t really teach anything about donkeys.  Who cares?  It is a beautiful tale your littles will thoroughly enjoy, and it will remind them to be grateful for what they have.

 

  The Wonky Donkey by Craig Smith

This is a great read-aloud for littles, with lots of wordplay and hilarity.  The watercolor pictures are soft and lovely, but the depictions of the donkey and the various things that make him wonky are hilarious.  The book comes with a free downloadable song of the story, so that’s something great to get stuck in your head. 🙂  It also provides a lesson on diversity and how being different is a quality we all have and that is not a bad thing.

Donkey-donkey by Roger Duvoisin

This is the story of a donkey who is embarrassed by his ears.  All the other farm animals have beautiful ears; why do his have to be so long?  He sets about following the advice of his animal friends in order to solve his problem (reminiscent of Leo the Lop by Stephen Cosgrove, another all-time fave of mine.  In fact, I have a lop-eared rabbit named Leo).  But when a little girl comes to the farm and admires the donkey’s long ears, he is given a new-found confidence.  The simple pen-and-ink drawings are entertaining and the lesson about loving yourself for who you are is priceless.

The House at Pooh Corner by A.A. Milne

No way can we talk about donkeys here without mentioning Eeyore, the all-time best donkey ever.  Any of Milne’s collections will have him in them, but my favorite Eeyore story is in this one.  If you have littles that love the Disney version, go ahead and find a Disney picture book about Eeyore.  But if you really want to them to know this loveable guy, go for the original.  Lots of lessons here about learning to recognize when people love you and dropping the soul-sucking pessimism.  Plus, he’s just plain Funny!
Teeny Tiny Ernest by Laura T. Barnes

Here’s another tale about loving yourself for who you are (why are donkeys so good for that?!).  In this one, Ernest gets up to all kinds of hijinks while trying to impress his friends with his height.  Of course, he is not tall, so he doesn’t fool anybody.  Soon he realizes that he’s the only one who notices his size–all his friends like him for who he is, not what he looks like.  Another wonderful lesson, told in a fun, engaging way.  Ernest has a whole series of books, too, if your little falls in love with him like we have.
The Last Battle (Book 7 of The Chronicles of Narnia) by C.S. Lewis

This final chapter in the Narnia books stars Puzzle the donkey as one of the antagonists.  Puzzle is a bit dense but has a good heart.  He is the faithful sidekick of Shift, an ape who has it out for the Narnians.  Shift manipulates Puzzle into carrying out his orders, including risking his life to steal the skin of a lion from the Caldron Pool, then wearing it to imitate Aslan.  In the end, Puzzle does what is right and, after a short conversation with Aslan, is admitted into Aslan’s country.  As in all the Narnia books, there are lots of lessons here about how to be a good person, but particularly in Puzzle’s case, how to think for oneself and not allow peer pressure to influence decisions.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare

This is one of Shakespeare’s funniest plays and Bottom, whose head gets transformed into that of a donkey’s by Puck, is the funniest character.  He is silly and foolish, and nothing about his antics ever really redeems him.  It makes this a great play with which to introduce your littles to Shakespeare.  Plus, I’m pretty sure you can get it for free on Kindle or you can read it online for free here.

Animal Farm by George Orwell

You can’t have a group of political farm animals without including a stubborn donkey.  In fact, Benjamin the Donkey is so stubborn he absolutely refuses to get excited about the rebellion.  He is the oldest animal on the farm and kind of an Eeyore with a brain.  Very cynical.  Because he is longer-lived than the other animals, he sees the rebellion and the new regime as passing fads.  He’s pretty sure he’s going to live to see what comes next, so he just can’t drum up any enthusiasm for all the plots and machinations.  He’s one of my favorite characters simply for his detached amusement about all the goings-on.

Pick one or more of these books to add to a class about donkeys and you’re sure to perk up your littles’ interest.  Even just reading excerpts from the chapter books or the play can give your child a little insight into what we humans think of the donkey’s character.  Silly, foolish, stubborn, fiercely loyal… Yeah, that describes our donkey, too. 🙂

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Love wins,

KT