• My affiliate links won't hurt you, but they might help feed my kids. See my full disclosure policy in the main menu.

The Wonder of Wordless Books

6 of our favorite wordless books for kids to use in our homeschool for creative writing and thinking

Wordless books are so cool.

They  tell a story with pictures rather than words. They let your child come up with his own story.  The pictures are usually vivid and detailed, which helps with focus and concentration.

When there are no words to go with the pictures, your child is more likely to notice details.  Your child gets a better understanding of plot when she has to visually see the beginning, middle, and end of the story.    The possibilities for imagination are endless.

How cool is it to make up your own story to go with the pictures?

I loved cuddling up with my boys when they were very small and watching them gaze at wordless books.  And as they grew, I used wordless books as teaching tools.

How to use wordless books

There are so many ways to utilize these amazing books for learning.

For toddlers, wordless books can be used as a precursor to reading. Before you start letter recognition, phonics, and sight words, let them look at books that don’t have any words.  Compare those books with books that do have words.  Talk about the differences.

For preschoolers, they can encourage higher thinking by providing opportunity for open-ended questions.  (What if cats could fly?)  They can learn to recognize emotion through body language and facial expression.  They can begin to express themselves through their own story-telling.

For older kids, wordless books are a fabulous lead-in to creative writing. When I was a librarian, wordless books were among my favorite tools to use with my writing group, and I totally stole the idea to use in my homeschool.  And I mean yeah, I know, I’m a born writer, but I crush hard on coming up with your own words for a book.  I’ve never met a child who didn’t enjoying doing so.

6 of our favorite wordless books for kids to use in our homeschool for creative writing and thinking

Our favorite wordless books

 In the Woods by Ermanno Cristini is among our favorite wordless books for kids

In the Woods by Ermanno Cristini

You can see where this one is going.  What a great addition to nature study!  Use this book to find things to look for outside or to write a story wrapping up a nature walk.

Sea of Dreams by Dennis Nolan is among our favorite wordless books for kids to use in our homeschool for creative writing and thinking

Sea of Dreams by Dennis Nolan

Studying the ocean?  Planning a beach field trip?  This book is a perfect addition.  You could use it for a ship study, a Viking study, an Age of Exploration study… Yeah, this one is versatile.

Rainstorm by Barbara Lehman is among our favorite wordless books for kids to use in our homeschool for creative writing and thinking

Rainstorm by Barbara Leman

This one is perfect for a weather study or a rainy day.  Plus, just look at the beautiful colors!

Journey by Aaron Becker  is among our favorite wordless books for kids to use in our homeschool for creative writing and thinking

Journey by Aaron Becker

Oh me.  Oh my.  This lovely book, about a girl who uses a red marker to create her own adventure, is an ideal creative writing lesson.  Check out Becker’s two other glorious wordless books, Quest and Return.

A Boy, a Dog, and a Frog by Mercer Mayer is among our favorite wordless books for kids to use in our homeschool for creative writing and thinking

A Boy, a Dog, and a Frog by Mercer Mayer

Because Mercer Mayer.  And frog studies, pond studies, and even dog studies.

Tuesday by David Wiesner  is among our favorite wordless books for kids to use in our homeschool for creative writing and thinking

Tuesday by David Wiesner

These illustrations are incredible.  Ponds, frogs, toads, turtles, birds, fantastic journeys… This one is full of good stuff.  Have fun.

Grab some wordless books and let your littles’ imaginations run wild.  My favorite part of using them as creative writing prompts is to compare what the boys come up with.  Every child thinks uniquely, even when looking at the same pictures, and it’s so fun to get a glimpse of that.

Let me know how it turns out.

Love wins,

KT

KT Brison
Follow me!

KT Brison

KT Brison is a former children’s librarian and educator who gave all that up for the most important job in her life—homeschooling her boys.Though she loves the outdoors and rambling around her farm, she can usually be found with her nose in a book. Any book. As long as it has words.
KT Brison
Follow me!

About KT Brison

KT Brison is a former children’s librarian and educator who gave all that up for the most important job in her life—homeschooling her boys. Though she loves the outdoors and rambling around her farm, she can usually be found with her nose in a book. Any book. As long as it has words.
Bookmark the permalink.

13 Comments

  1. I love wordless picture books!

  2. Love that description “because Mercer Mayer” I agree, you really don’t need to say more.
    L. E. Mastilock recently posted…Relaxed Homeschool ScheduleMy Profile

  3. My boys enjoy wordless books and we also found that Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick was 1/2 wordless picture book and 1/2 story. It was great for them since they were older. Thanks for sharing with us at Love to Learn. Pinned.
    Mother of 3 recently posted…Weekly Wrap-Up: 4th of July CelebrationsMy Profile

  4. We have always loved wordless books. I love how they invite a new story each time. Goodnight Gorilla is our favorite! I’ve never heard of ANY of these! Thanks for the recommendations.
    Kelly Sage recently posted…Love to Learn Blog Hop- Ideas and Activities to Inspire the Love of LearningMy Profile

  5. Why have I not thought of these? Great idea!! I have a library trip coming up this week so I’ll be sure to see if they have any of your suggestions. Thanks KT
    Jen recently posted…Best Books of the 2016-2017 School YearMy Profile

  6. Our favorite wordless books used to be the “Carl” series by Alexandra Day; “Flotsam” by David Weisner; and many others. These were great for helping children develop their own sense of imagination, understand communication of a story, and articulation. Plus, it was fun!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge